Helpful Info

Nursing Homes and Long Term Care – tips and questions

Nursing Homes and Long Term Care – tips and questions Don’t just sign up for an official tour. Walk around and see the place for yourself. If you’re on the official tour ask to see other floors, otherwise you may only be shown the cleanest floor with the low maintenance patients. Ask what the resident mix is. Ask who your loved one may have for a roommate. Find out if it is possible that they could be placed with a resident with aggressive behaviour? Hang out in the lobby and see what kind of people surface. A lot of the time the physically fit, younger people will hang out there because they don’t have anywhere else to go. Visit the homes at meal time. This will allow you to see what the staffing ratio is and the resident mix for yourself. Also see what it’s like after meal time. How are the residents returned back to their rooms? Is there enough staff to care for them? If possible, go early in the morning to see if the residents are dressed for breakfast. If not, there likely isn’t enough staff to care for them all. Talk to the…

Coping With Alzheimer’s Disease

Coping With Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer's is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. One of the hardest parts of dealing with Alzheimer’s disease is knowing that an elder will never get better. The disease causes cognitive deterioration, and while this process can be slowed, there is currently no way to cure it. The progression can be difficult for families because even though they can enjoy the remaining time with their relative, there is no hope that they will recover. Understanding the disease makes it easier for families and sufferers to cope with the progression of the illness and help them make the most of the time remaining with their family member. A reputable In-Home Care agency can provide occasional respite care and additional support in the home when needed. Symptoms While short term memory loss is the most obvious sign of dementia, your loved one may deal…

Household Clutter and Poor Hygiene Could Be Signs that Your Loved One is Suffering from Depression

Household Clutter and Poor Hygiene Could Be Signs that Your Loved One is Suffering from Depression Relying on a caregiver can greatly increase a senior’s quality of life and safety when they have trouble caring for themselves Learn more about getting good care from a bonded, insured professional. Email us at care@amyshelpinghands.ca or call 519-915-4370. Children of seniors may have a difficult time determining if their parent needs additional help. Their parents may be reluctant to share their daily struggles with their children because they are embarrassed or feel they may be a burden. In other cases, seniors may not even realize they are struggling. If you are concerned that your senior parents may be having issues, but you know they are not ready to move into a care facility, consider hiring an in-home caregiver. North Bay Seniors can call on the services of Sequoia Senior Solutions for help with day-to-day life in their home. If you are a child of senior parents and you suspect they could use some additional help, consider the following signs: 10. The next time you are visiting…

FREE Online Educational Courses for families caring for seniors

FREE Online Educational Courses for families caring for seniors Amy’s Helping Hands has taken a significant new step to help address some of the biggest concerns families have with caring for their aging parents: education, time and support. Recent statistics indicate that 80% of caregiving duties are provided by family members. This takes the form of sons, daughters, grandchildren, nieces and  nephews providing informal care for their aging relatives and loved ones. “Many times caring for seniors comes with increased stress and sacrificing personal time juggling family, work and caregiving responsibilities.“ says Amy Szewczuk, Owner. One resource Amy’s Helping Hands is excited to offer the public is FREE online courses for family caregivers to learn more about caring for their senior loved one and themselves. “This resource is our way of giving back to Windsor and Essex County. We are honoured by the Windsor Chamber New Business of the Year Award along with the hundreds of families that have selected us for senior care services. In speaking…

Things to ask your aging parents…

Things to ask your aging parents… It’s not easy. A growing number of families with aging parents and grandparents are facing some very tough questions. Where will their senior loved ones live? Who will care for them? Where can they find affordable care? The goal for many families is to help seniors remain independent and in their own homes as long as possible. Most don’t require constant supervision or medical attention, yet. Right now, all they really need is a helping hand. “Most seniors want to remain in the comfort and security of their own homes, and can do so safely with a little bit of help,” said Amy Szewczuk, Care Director and Owner of Amy’s Helping Hands. The company provides compassionate caregivers who go to the senior’s home and help with chores, such as light housekeeping, laundry, meal preparation, transportation, bathing, grooming, and medication reminders – tasks that have become difficult for seniors to perform. “Family members are the largest group of caregivers,” said Szewczuk. “Two…

Mom or Dad is Coming Home from the Hospital…. What to expect.

Mom or Dad is Coming Home from the Hospital…. What to expect. When your loved one has been in the hospital, coming home can bring many changes and challenges.  Whether it is living alone after a medical event or moving in with family members, a plan is needed before coming home. Prepare for the fact that Life is going to change – Things to consider are: •         The level of support they may need for the short and long term •         Changes in medications •         Managing time for appointments and rehab visits •         Their ability to get around •         Anxieties about if or when the next hospitalization may occur •         How much support will they need to be comfortable? •         Do I have enough time to adequately care for them? Talk to the professionals in the social work and discharge planning departments at the hospital and CCAC about what to expect. Base your plan upon their suggestions. It may be recommended you obtain or purchase and install home supportive…

Tools to Help your Parents to Age in Place

Tools to Help your Parents to Age in Place Aging in place is a new approach to eldercare. It allows the elderly to remain in their own homes as they age, rather than having to be moved to a nursing home or assisted living facility. To enable aging in place, there are many tools on the market that make it possible for your aging parent to remain independent and self-reliant. The tools assist your parent by making up for deficiencies they may have. Hearing Tools Most aging parents suffer from some kind of hearing loss, whether it is minor or profound. To enable them to age in place and adapt to challenges with hearing, there is everything from a vibrating watch that reminds them when to take medications to hearing devices that amplify sound to visual and vibrating alerts for the telephone and fire alarm. Vision Tools Even if your parent does not suffer from a disabling condition like macular degeneration, deteriorating eye sight is another struggle most seniors experience that can cause them to lose some of their independence. When…

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is the weakening of bones and occurs in one quarter of all women, and one eighth of all men. Although the rate of osteoporosis is much higher among women, it is certainly not just a woman’s illness. Increasing numbers of men are affected by osteoporosis. Sadly, it is often a fractured bone that alerts someone to the fact that they have osteoporosis. Low trauma fractures—fractures that occur from a standing height or less—are sometimes the only warning sign evident to someone about their bone health. Fractures can cause dire consequences, especially in seniors. One year after a hip fracture, 80% of patients cannot perform at least one activity of daily living, 40% cannot walk independently, 30% are permanently disabled, and 20% have died. While a hip fracture does not cause death directly, it can be the result of underlying frailty, and it is usually other health factors which lead to death. Sustaining good bone health is an important way to prevent a low trauma fracture.…

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