Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care

When Living with Dementia, Use These Simple Methods for Effective Communication

When Living with Dementia, Use These Simple Methods for Effective Communication Connecting with a senior loved one trying to cope with all the struggles of Alzheimer’s or dementia, particularly in the middle and later stages, may be frustrating – both for you and for your loved one. Brain changes affect the ability to hear, process, and respond effectively to conversations, and it’s up to us to employ new ways of communicating in order to connect with an individual more successfully. However, doing so is much easier than it may seem. We already communicate nonverbally in a variety of ways, such as: Physical contact Posture and motion Eye contact Facial expressions Gestures Personal space Consider these methods to incorporate more nonverbal communication in your interactions with a senior loved one: Offer assurance through a caring touch. If a senior loved one is comfortable with touch, hold and pat the senior’s hand, rub his/her back, put an arm around your loved one’s shoulders, and provide affectionate hugs.  Look the senior in the eye. Eye contact conveys…

5 Things That Can Worsen Alzheimer’s Symptoms

5 Things That Can Worsen Alzheimer’s Symptoms While there are particular commonalities, Alzheimer’s disease affects every person uniquely. Our highly trained dementia caregivers know, for instance, that even though one person may find pleasure in being outdoors, another could possibly be overwhelmed by so much sensory input and prefer a quieter indoor environment. One may prefer a morning bath routine, while a dose of resourcefulness is important to help another maintain good hygiene.  We also understand that there are particular triggers that could often worsen Alzheimer’s symptoms. Family care providers should always be especially careful in order to avoid the following: Dehydration. Those with dementia may not be in a position to identify when they are thirsty, or may reject offered fluids. It’s crucial to ensure proper hydration to prevent added confusion and weakness. Plain water is best, but if refused, try flavored waters, as well as various kinds of cups or bottles. Isolation. Individuals diagnosed with dementia suffer…

The Female Factor: Why the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Remains Higher in Women Than Men

The Female Factor: Why the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease Remains Higher in Women Than Men Scientists are at long last starting to gain an understanding on the discrepancy between the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s in women and men. Presently, up to 65% of those with Alzheimer’s over the age of 65 in Canada are female, and through a growing body of research, scientists are beginning to believe that biological and social determinants play an important role in the rate of diagnosis. At the recent Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in Los Angeles, Rebecca Edelmayer, the Alzheimer’s Association’s Director of Scientific Engagement, stated, “Women are at the epicenter of Alzheimer’s disease as both persons living with the disease and as caregivers of those with dementia. Over the last three years, the Alzheimer’s Association has invested $3.2 million into 14 projects looking at sex differences for the disease and some of the findings today may explain risk, prevalence, and rate of decline for women.”  The longstanding opinion has been that women essentially…

In-Home Care Windsor-Essex: Hygiene Help for Individuals Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease

In-Home Care Windsor-Essex: Hygiene Help for Individuals Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease Of the many struggles linked to providing care for a family member with dementia, one of the most prevalent challenges is with personal hygiene, for various reasons: Diminished sense of vision and smell Comfort associated with familiarity (for example, needing to wear the same clothes again and again) The complexities of bathing, compounded by cognitive impairment and confusion Anxiety about falling, the noises and feelings associated with the water, and much more Cajoling, arguing, and reasoning are rarely practical tactics with those impacted by Alzheimer’s or any other form of dementia. Instead, attempt these innovative techniques from the Alzheimer Society in the event your loved one resists maintaining appropriate hygiene: Organize the bathroom in advance so the room will be comfortable and you will not need to juggle obtaining supplies in conjunction with assisting the senior. Warm the room with a space heater, and put soap, shampoo, towels, washcloth, etc. within easy reach, plus…

Important Alzheimer’s and Dementia Updates

Important Alzheimer’s and Dementia Updates According to the Alzheimer Society 2017 – 2018 Impact Report, more than 500,000 Canadians are living with dementia. That number is expected to increase by 66% by 2031, to over 937,000 Canadians. Because of this expected growth, it is important for people to know the most up-to-date information and prevalent risk factors.   If you are one of the 1 in 5 Canadians who have experienced providing care for a senior with Alzheimer’s or dementia, you’re undoubtably aware of the investment in time required: in fact, 87% of caregivers wish that more people understood the realities of caring for someone with dementia.   Key findings from the report include: People who smoke have a 45% greater risk of developing dementia 65% of people diagnosed over the age of 65 are women 1.1 million Canadians are affected directly or indirectly by dementia or Alzheimer’s The annual cost to care for Canadians with dementia is $10.4 billion Of considerable importance in the future of dementia research is…

How Partnering with Windsor Home Care Professionals for Dementia Care is Beneficial

How Partnering with Windsor Home Care Professionals for Dementia Care is Beneficial Although an incredible number of older adults are struggling with the challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, an even greater number of family members are trying to cope with caring for them. Interestingly, nearly 75% of family caregivers are managing their senior loved ones’ dementia care needs by themselves, with only 26% seeking professional care services. Naturally, families want to do all they can to satisfy their loved ones’ needs, but dementia caregiving can result in a very high level of both mental and physical stress. This takes a toll on the caretakers' own health and wellbeing in the long run, particularly as the disease advances. And many members of the family believe there is an all-or-nothing strategy: either oversee their loved one's needs in the home, or face moving her or him into residential care. Fortunately, Amy’s Helping Hands in Windsor offers an alternative that’s good for seniors with dementia as well as their family caregivers: the addition of an…

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