--

Family Caregiver Tips

Be a Better Caregiver: Tips for Senior Advocacy

Be a Better Caregiver: Tips for Senior Advocacy Trusting someone you love into the care of somebody else is never easy, especially for a senior family member. Whether at home or in a facility, you will have questions you need answered. You’ll also want to be ready to advocate for the older adult to proactively address issues and immediately resolve problems that do take place. This will help you to be a better caregiver and support system for the senior. For instance, review the following typical situations and how to most effectively advocate should they develop with an older adult you love: You live at a distance. Thanks to technology, it’s easier than ever to remain close to a long-distance relative and also to keep a finger on the pulse of how things are going. FaceTime, Zoom, or Skype with the older adult frequently to check in. If a family portal is available for the care provider and family members to share notes and comments, make full use of this communication tool. And if you’re not able to visit in person, ask a friend…

Vacations for Family Caregivers: Are They Even Possible?

Vacations for Family Caregivers: Are They Even Possible? Perhaps you’ve been listening longingly to friends and family talking about their next cruise, camping trip, or week at the beach. Summertime is the perfect time for a getaway, but you can’t possibly get away this year while caring for an older loved one. Or can you? Actually, not only are vacations for family caregivers possible, but they’re important for both your own wellbeing and that of the person in your care. Neglecting self-care can set you on the trajectory to burnout and depression, and can impact the quality of care you’re able to provide. The process is smoother and easier than you may realize: Talk with the senior. Let the person know that you’re planning a little time away so there are no last-minute surprises. If the senior is in the mid- to later stages of dementia, however, you may need to have the conversation multiple times before your departure. Begin care services prior to your vacation. Bringing in a respite caregiver now allows the senior to feel comfortable…

Senior Finances: What to Do When a Frugal Senior Refuses Care

Senior Finances: What to Do When a Frugal Senior Refuses Care Many of today’s older adults were raised in the Great Depression. They lived through a period when the country was cutting corners and pinching pennies. Frugality was embedded in many of them while very young and quite often remains firmly in place for life, often impacting senior finances throughout aging. So what occurs when an older adult is in need of care at home, has the financial ability to afford care, but does not want to spend the money required for that care? First, empathize. Understand that the person’s viewpoint is valid and based on past life experiences. If the senior seems to be reluctant to the notion of spending money for the care they need, remind yourself of the emotions behind the behaviors. An added layer of difficulty might be in simply accepting the need for care altogether, something which is far beyond mere frugality. Spend some time shopping with the senior. Costs were far different years ago than they are today, for everything from a gallon of milk to a…

Family Caregiver Tips: How to Cope with Feeling Unappreciated

Family Caregiver Tips: How to Cope with Feeling Unappreciated From the time you woke up this morning up until the end of an exhausting day, you’ve given your all to your older loved one. You provided help with showering and dressing, prepared nutritious meals, cleaned the house, all while making sure a senior loved one was happily involved in meaningful activities, made it to their 3:00 hair appointment, and picked up groceries and prescriptions afterwards. And while you are not doing any of these things for a pat on the back, a simple “thank you” would be nice – but is rarely offered. If you’re feeling under-appreciated or completely unappreciated altogether, you’re not alone. This is definitely a frequent occurrence in caregiving for a number of reasons, and if not addressed, may lead to caregiver depression or burnout. These family caregiver tips can help. Start modeling appreciative behavior. Let the senior see by example how good it feels to be appreciated by sincerely thanking them whenever the chance arises. If they fold and hang…

4 Ways to Foster and Strengthen Senior Friendships

4 Ways to Foster and Strengthen Senior Friendships f you’ve ever watched young children on the playground, you know how effortlessly friendships are formed. A small group might be playing hide-and-seek, and a newcomer dashes over with a breathless, “Can I play?” More often than not, the reply is a resounding, “Yes!” and thus – instant friends. If only it were that simple as adults! Senior friendships offer a wealth of benefits, and they are especially essential for older adults who have been impacted by COVID-related isolation protocols. So how could you help the older adults you love to increase socialization and also make some new friends? Short of jumping into a pick-up game of tag, try these guidelines: Join a club. Brainstorm topics of interest with your family member: knitting, reading, gardening, fishing, sports. Next, search on the internet for groups in your neighborhood that meet up to enjoy those activities together. The neighborhood senior center is likely to be a terrific resource as well. If you cannot find an…

Learn How to Advocate for Ageing Parents by Improving These 4 Skills

Learn How to Advocate for Ageing Parents by Improving These 4 Skills “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” – Dr. Seuss, The Lorax Learning how to advocate for aging parents isn’t always easy; but advocating for those you love is perhaps one of the greatest honors – and responsibilities – you’ll have as a family caregiver. It means fully comprehending the other person’s wishes and needs, and communicating them to those who can help ensure they are fulfilled. If the role seems daunting and perhaps more than you feel equipped to carry out, or if you are just now having to learn how to advocate for ageing parents, there are several steps you can take to strengthen the skills you’ll need to be most effective. Observe. It may seem to go without saying, but with so many things vying for your attention, it can be easy to pay less attention than needed to subtle shifts in a senior’s condition, behaviors, or mood. It’s helpful to first make sure your own self-care needs are met so you’re…

Loading...